The Dongo Kundu Bypass is a bypass expected to link the mainland Mombasa to South-Coast. The project once complete is expected to serve as an alternative to Likoni ferry.

The single carriage bypass starts at Miritini at the mainland and will cover 17.5km to Ngómbeni at the South-Coast.

The project will be constructed in three phases, and the first phase will involve construction of a road that links Kipevu to Miritini and another to link Dongo Kundu with Mwache. Phase two will be long span bridges over the creeks that will link Mwache to Dongo Kundu. Finally, phase three will see construction of a link from Dongo Kundu to Kibundani, to link with Likoni- Lunga Lunga.

The project which has been in pipeline for decades is estimated will cost Sh40 billion and is expected to be completed after four years. According to the government, the most difficult part will be building the bridge connecting Mombasa Island to the mainland. The government has already signed an agreement with Japan International Coopertation Agency (Jica) to finance to project at a cost of Sh29 billion. The loan will be repaid for a period of 30 years with a grace period of 10 years.

Other projects in Dongo Kundu

The government also plans to build another 5.7 km Kipevu link road, in an effort to reduce traffic congestion in the Mombasa area which is normally caused by trucks which has escalated the cost of doing business in the Kenya’s second largest city. Also to be constructed in the South Coast is a new container terminal, a free port at Dongo Kundu and a thermal power plant. The free port is projected to be similar to the one in Dubai, U.A.E.

Mombasa which serves as a gateway East African countries’ like Uganda, South Sudan, Rwanda, and Congo DRC, will have the bypass to ease movement of goods from the port of Mombasa. This will greatly improve trade coupled with the construction of the standard gauge railway line.

The Dongo Kundu bypass will also play a big role in developing tourism and agriculture in the South-Coast that has in past depended on the Likoni ferry to transport passengers, goods, and vehicles. Whenever a ferry experiences a mishap, it leads to limited pick up rate which commonly causes commotion with tourists headed in either way not spared either.

The Dongo Kundu bypass is part of the Kenyan government’s plan to build 10,000 km of roads in the country through alternative financing in the next 5 years. This will be a big stride in road infrastructure considering the country has only managed to pave 14,000km of roads since it gained independence 50 years ago.